Ancient Indigenous forest gardens still yield bounty 150 years later

Originally planted with a rich array of edible and medicinal flora for people to use, forest gardens are now a source of food for animals and pollinators. While human activities, such as industrial land management, are often seen as being harmful to biodiversity, their study shows how Indigenous practices have benefited the health and resilience of forest ecosystems in the long-term, the researchers say.

Chile: 35 years of successful recovery of the Burrowing Parrots

The Burrowing Parrot, in spanish, ”Loro Tricahue”, (Cyanoliseus patagonus), also known as the burrowing parakeet or the Patagonian conure, is a species of parrot native to Argentina and Chile. The Burrowing Parrot was on the brink of extinction, with small populations fragmented throughout Chile.

The Burrowing parrots/ Loros Tricahue, that inhabit Chile are an endemic subspecies, that is, they cannot be found anywhere else in the world. It is one of the four native parrots and also the largest. It was on the brink of extinction,” says Marcia Ricci, head of Conservation of Biological Diversity at CONAF in the O’Higgins region.

Only 19% of Earth’s land is still ‘wild’

The paper “debunks an important myth” in conservation circles, says Massachusetts Institute of Technology aerospace engineer Danielle Wood, who studies technology and international development but was not involved with the new work. By offering a long-term look at humans’ impact on the planet, the study reveals that it’s not people per se that send biodiversity on a downward spiral, but it’s instead the overexploitation of resources, she explains. If their practices are sustainable, “humans don’t have to be removed,” to save the world’s species.