The Graphene Oxide Media Lie and Informed Consent of a Patient.

In spring, 2021, the International Journal of Clinical Practice, published an important critical review on patient understanding of the experimental covid jab. They stated ”Patient comprehension is a critical part of meeting medical ethics standards of informed consent in study designs. The aim of the study was to determine if sufficient literature exists to require clinicians to disclose the specific risk that COVID‐19 vaccines could worsen disease upon exposure to challenge or circulating virus”.

Generally, people have such blind faith in the governments and medicine, they forget that these all still care about making a profit, especially pharmaceutical companies. It seems the indoctrination of fear numbs the ability of people to question the full validity and safety of what is being offered to them so quickly as a solution, their vulnerability allows them to be exploited. Meanwhile, the reality is that corporate big tech and governments alike have supressed safe alternative repurposed and award winning medicines like Hydroxychloroquine or Ivermectin, that has already been shown to be 100 percent effective and safe preventative treatment of SARS‐CoV‐2 by non-biased frontline doctors who have saved thousands of lives with these measures. Meanwhile, people do not go so far as to question the plutocratic monopoly of pharmaceuticals or the world’s now 5 controlled news media agencies and how these entities together to protect corporate investments.

The masses believe in what is being peddled as the COVID-19 ”Vaccine”, without being presented well-informed facts. It is a Nuremberg code violation for doctors, nurses, or healthcare workers to administer any experimental medicine to a patient without educating the patient, and without offering alternative pre-existing safely tested preventative medicines such as Ivermectin, or hydroxychloroquine.

Doctors have a moral and ethical duty to be sure that the patient is fully aware of the implications of taking an experimental medicine and the risks involved in these trials, especially when these covid shots were granted temporary FDA emergency use authorization, which means they have skipped normal animal lab testing trial protocols that usually last for years. These doctors and nurses aren’t protecting the patients but instead they are serving the vaccine companies and their profits, which is only resulting in the most shocking exponential number of patient adverse reactions and deaths on global databases that only collect 10 percent of reported adverse reactions, so if the number is already large and only ten percent are being reported, then what is the full scale reality of adverse reactions and deaths due to this experimental medicine?

Patients are not even told about the UK government Yellowcard Scheme, EU and Vaers data of adverse deaths and reactions, and it seems nor are the healthcare workers and advisors aware that these websites exist, and the doctors and nurses certainly don’t tell the patients to look at these sites first before going ahead with the medication.  Medical research group in the U.K. pointed out that the Wuhan coronavirus (COVID-19) vaccines are “unsafe for humans” based on adverse event reports. Scientists and doctors looked at data from the British government’s Yellow Card vaccine event reporting system. They found that the “overwhelming” number of adverse reactions from COVID-19 vaccines definitely raised alarm bells. Dr. Tess Lawrie is a world-class researcher and consultant to the World Health Organization, she recently wrote to the MHRA regarding the Yellowcard deaths and adverse reactions. Dr, Naomi Wolf wrote on her telegram channel on Dr Lawrie et al, ”Researchers at the Evidence-based Medicine Consultancy (EbMC) research group based in Bath, England unveiled concerning findings. EbMC Director Dr. Tess Lawrie wrote about her group’s findings in a June 9 letter to the MHRA Chief Executive Officer Dr. June Raine.”

Dr. Tess Lawrie wrote in her letter that between Jan. 4 and May 6 of this year, a total of 888,196 adverse events and 1,253 deaths were reported to Yellow Card. Similar to VAERS data, these were not directly proven as correlated with the COVID-19 vaccine. Despite this, the EMBC director raised safety concerns for those getting the vaccine. She wrote that given the Yellow Card figures, “the MHRA now has more than enough evidence … to declare the COVID-19 vaccine unsafe for use in humans.”

Lawrie’s urgent questions for the MHRA were to respond as soon as possible. She asked how many people have died within 28 days of vaccination and how many people have been hospitalized for the same period. She also asked for the total number of people disabled by the vaccination. (Since the actual Yellowcard data only reflects ten percent of reported cases, so that leaves the question, what about the unreported cases?).

In a later interview with TrialSiteNews, she described the total number of cases as “concerning” and called for follow-ups on persons who reported adverse reactions “to ensure there are no further problems.” Lawrie said: “The scope of morbidity is striking, evidencing a lot of incidents and what amounts to a large number of ill.

Lawrie also lamented that Yellow Card was “incredibly opaque” during her TrialSiteNews interview. She shared that researchers are unable to filter vaccine safety incidents by age, gender or other attributed. According to the EbMC director, about 60 percent or more of COVID-19 vaccines in the U.K. came from AstraZeneca, with the remainder from the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine. The letter called on the MHRA to urgently make reports of vaccine adverse reaction public, given that pharmacovigilance data is known to be subsequently under-reported. It also called on the regulator to assist people with reporting adverse reactions.

”Lawrie concluded the letter: “Preparation should be made to scale up humanitarian efforts to assist those harmed by the COVID-19 vaccines, and to anticipate and ameliorate medium to longer term effects. As the mechanism for harms from the vaccines appears to be similar to COVID-19 itself, this includes engaging with numerous international doctors and scientists with expertise in successfully treating COVID-19.” – Dr Naomi Wolf.

Patients are being left out on a limb when they are not told about adverse events or where to find out this information about the reported events. Moreover, patients are not being told that in the event that anything were to happen to them after taking the covid jab, they are not going to get the legal or financial support they would require, let alone, knowledgeable treatment on how to deal with the medical ”side effects”. The vaccine manufacturers have been granted immunity by governments, prior to the emergency roll out, which means they aren’t liable to be sued for damages should the patient suffer adverse reactions or death and require financial compensation.

Patients are generally not told the actual facts which are that it is a biological experimental mRNA based gene therapy, not actually a vaccine. They aren’t being informed that this experimental medicine has never been done before and or the effects of the novel ingredients such as the mRNA and nanoparticles. Therefore, due to the emergency FDA roll out, this covid jab has not undergone any of the normal lab trial animal studies, nor usual safety measures which a normal vaccine is usually subject to, including, 7 to 10 years of animal experiments, laboratory tests, risk assessments and safety measures before being offered to the public.

A journal article published in International Journal of Clinical Practice recently published in spring of 2021, shows research that all of these Covid jabs are given without the patient being made aware of the full details on implications and side effects, as Dr Tess Lawrie and thousands of other concerned doctors and scientists are saying but who not being given a voice by the main stream media. Therefore, the sad fact remains, if patients are not being fully informed and only partially informed, they cannot give full informed consent. Nuremberg violations are being broken on an unprecedented scale, and the critical implications of this being ignored all for profit for governments and corporations who will become liable for their actions along with doctors, nurses and public health advisors who have ignored their Hippocratic oath to protect the patient. Furthermore, the PCR test which was not designed for detecting viruses, according to scientists who work with PCR tests, Karry Mullis the original innovator stated this test was designed to read genomes not virus material, it cannot identify viruses. The correct number of cycles according to experienced lab scientists should not go beyond the limit of 11 cycle threshold, the higher the number of cycles the higher the number of distorted false positives. Therefore, why are governments and health advisors setting the threshold so high, 25, 35 and 45 cycle thresholds that provide higher false positives to keep generating increased inaccurate statistics, in order to keep the emergency situation to continue to administer an experimental medicine without the normal safety test criteria.

As we know, the experimental biological agent being peddled as a vaccine has been widely administered. Aside from the mercury, cancer cells, (mutagenic MRC-5 cell line), polyethylene glycol (PEG), the animal and aborted human foetal cells, lets consider the implications of other patented genetic material contained in what is described as innovative medicine by mainstream media and governments, mRNA spike proteins use aluminium or other metalic nanoparticles contained in the vaccine. Furthermore, another interesting point raised by Dr. Chinda Brandolino is the ramifications of whoever is administered this patented mRNA gene therapy, will lose human rights and become property of those who own the mRNA patent.

Graphene OxideWho is telling the truth about Graphene Oxide in the Covid Jab-Main Stream Media and the Vaccine Manufacturers or La Quinta Columna?

La Quinta Columna TV shared results of lab tests that discovered large quantities of graphene oxide in these ”vaccines”, however, mainstream media moguls and sponsored fact checkers quickly rebuttals this as a false claim, however, if an independent journalist, scientist or critical thinker looks at the scientific journals in nanomedicine, one will see it is clearly true, graphene oxide nanoparticles are in fact discussed as a serious nanoparticle ingredients used in these innovative experimental covid jab medicines.

The shocking realization leaves us to conclude La Quinta Columna TV are correct- graphene oxide is being used in the covid jabs and obviously, the vaccine manufacturers are liars protecting their own profits, moreover, how has it become a reality that we live in a society, where corporate media and sponsored fact checkers are biasedly supporting these pharmaceutical profits as well? What happened to democracy? Doesn’t this feel like communism? How are they allowed to get away with such huge lies with the gravest of consequences being hundreds of thousands of human deaths and adverse reactions? Just for protecting invested stakeholders with a major role in the suppression of truth or why else would paid journalists and news agencies lie? This takes us back to the plutocracy that is now designing our consensual reality especially in highly controlled news media and big tech censoring of the real facts and real science, no matter what the consequences are, including human death and suffering. See below Frontiers in Medicine, have published at article in June, 2021 on the use of Graphene oxide in the covid jab. Frontiers in Medicine specialize in research and medical innovations in the area of Infectious disease, surveillance, prevention and treatment.

The article is called ”Nanomedicine: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approach to COVID-19”, the article openly discusses the surveillance advantages of nanoparticles and metals such as graphene oxide

There are several designs for nanoparticle-based peptide vaccines. Nanoparticles can be used to construct a multiple antigen-presenting platform. Self-assembling lipo-peptides, consisting of a lipid chain bound to an antigen, can form micelles with enhanced epitope presentation ability”.

Their size, ranging from 10 to 100 nm, allows them to easily interact with a biological target of similar size and pass through several types of membranes, such as the lung-blood vessel junction and the blood-brain barrier ”.

Doctors have been raising concerns that any nanoparticle material that can cross the blood brain barrier can increase risk of blood clotting in the brain.

Specialized nanoparticles with a magnetic nature can be guided through the body via a system of external magnets and forced to increase their temperature by exposing them to an oscillating magnetic field, a technique currently used in oncology for tumor suppression”

”The SpyCatcher/SpyTag technology allows irreversible conjugation of a recombinant protein by adding a sequence of the SpyTag peptide (13 amino acids) to its DNA sequence. The SpyTag spontaneously reacts with the SpyCatcher protein and allows for oligomerization”.

”Recent advancements in nanotechnology have allowed for the release of a SARS-CoV-2 detection platform that uses graphene conjugated to an anti-spike antibody. This novel kit requires no sample pretreatment or labeling and is impressively effective in detecting SARS-CoV-2 at very low concentrations (183). Alternative detection methods have been designed such as dual-functioning plasmonic biosensors, which tap into the energetics of DNA-RNA hybridization, as well as Graphene Oxide particles coated with fluorophore-bound DNA target strands that can detect viral helicase”.

Graphene Oxide Nanoparticles (GO-NPs) have been shown to increase leukocyte numbers such as macrophages and T cells. This effect boosts adaptive immunity, thus allowing for a better immune response and viral clearance, or a possible use as vaccine adjuvants. In the scenario of uncontrolled hyperinflammation, nanodiamonds elicit an anti-inflammatory state in macrophages, while carbon and graphene sheets can be repurposed to remove pro-inflammatory cytokines and interleukins from the blood of patients , ”-Nanomedicine: A Diagnostic and Therapeutic Approach to COVID-19”. 4th June, 2021. -Arjun Sharma et al.

The article also outlines the limitations and drawbacks of the use of nanoparticles in the covid-19 jab,

Another limitation of nanoparticles are risks of unwanted tissue interactions and toxicity, unwanted spread and deposition in the body including unwanted crossing of the blood-brain barrier (194, 195). Accidental inhalation into the lungs is feared to cause epithelial injury, pulmonary inflammation and contribute to fibrosis depending on the size and chemical composition of the nanoparticles (196). Moreover, nanoparticles have been shown to interfere with biological processes like inflammation, oxidative stress, mitochondrial function, macrophage phagocytosis and platelet function (2). Acute or chronic toxicity of nanoparticles may be caused via ROS generation, cell membrane binding, DNA damage, altered cell cycle regulation and protein denaturation (197). Another important issue is the incomplete understanding of long-term effects of nanoparticles in humans and the environment. For example, a study on the effect of chronic administration of nanoparticles to rats resulted in structural damage in their testis, including disorganization of spermatogenic cells, misoriented testis and reduction of germ cells (198, 199). Allergic reactions and anaphylaxis to the mRNA lipid nanoparticle vaccines (Moderna, Pfizer/BioNtech) for COVID-19 have been blamed on the nanoparticle design and composition’‘ (200)

Graphene Oxide Patent for Vaccines

The invention is used as a novel adjuvant and vaccine, and can be expected to be used for preventing and treating human diseases. –Patent number CN112089834A

With this vital information about nanoparticles and how the body can react to them, shouldn’t this information be made readily and clearly available to every patient considering the covid jab?

Going back to the other journal article published in spring 2021, on patient’s informed consent-

Results of the study
”COVID‐19 vaccines designed to elicit neutralising antibodies may sensitise vaccine recipients to more severe disease than if they were not vaccinated. Vaccines for SARS, MERS and RSV have never been approved, and the data generated in the development and testing of these vaccines suggest a serious mechanistic concern: that vaccines designed empirically using the traditional approach (consisting of the unmodified or minimally modified coronavirus viral spike to elicit neutralising antibodies), be they composed of protein, viral vector, DNA or RNA and irrespective of delivery method, may worsen COVID‐19 disease via antibody‐dependent enhancement (ADE). This risk is sufficiently obscured in clinical trial protocols and consent forms for ongoing COVID‐19 vaccine trials that adequate patient comprehension of this risk is unlikely to occur, obviating truly informed consent by subjects in these trials.”

Conclusions drawn from the study and clinical implications
”The specific and significant COVID‐19 risk of ADE should have been and should be prominently and independently disclosed to research subjects currently in vaccine trials, as well as those being recruited for the trials and future patients after vaccine approval, in order to meet the medical ethics standard of patient comprehension for informed consent.”

by Carlita Shaw

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